clhollandwriter: (Default)
This one's for poets - a free course at edX, The Art of Poetry. It's an archived course, which mean there isn't a class community, but does mean it can be done at your own pace.
clhollandwriter: (Default)
Today, a final podcast (or two) - I Should be Writing, which is aimed at beginners, and  I Should be Writing: Ditch Diggers, about the business of writing.
clhollandwriter: (Default)
A final gift idea, since there's only a week to go. The Creative Writing Coursebook is based on the University of East Anglia's creative writing courses, and is suitable for beginners and more advanced writers.
clhollandwriter: (Default)
Probably more useful to literary writers and poets than spec fic writers, the Poets and Writers Submission Calendar has handy links to competitions and awards.
clhollandwriter: (Default)
Today, we have an article for plotters, 21 Plot shapes and the Pros and Cons of Each over at InterGalactic Medicine Show.
clhollandwriter: (Default)
Here's another audio site, Tabletop Audio, ostensibly for role plays but would also be good background for writing to. This one has less Hogwarts, but does have locations such as a 1920s speakeasy, a royal salon, and a city under siege.
clhollandwriter: (Default)
For today, another gift idea: 642 Things To Write About. There's also a young writer's edition. Enough prompts to keep anyone going all year!
clhollandwriter: (Default)
Another one for more established writers tody - or at least those with a back catalogue. Prolific reprinter Deborah Walker's blog post on selling reprints - Part One and Part Two.
clhollandwriter: (Default)
I was originally going to post about this first, but then it occurred to me that how long you need is likely to depend on what the subject matter is. Investigating all the myriad subgenres of speculative fiction is likely to take longer than if you're only interested in Steampunk.

There are three way you could go about picking a deadline.
1. Decide how long you want to spend on it, and pick your books and areas of study to fit the time available. It's all too easy to look at a genre from outside, or even one you're familiar with, and see so much to learn that it leads to being overwhelmed and choice paralysis. It's also easy to decide to do All The Things, make a reading list and to do pile that will take the rest of your life, and then make yourself miserable failing to do it. Setting yourself a deadline should help with this.
2. Decide on what you want to get done and set a timescale based on it. This is the NaNoWriMo approach - "I will write 50k in 30 days!" If you know you want to write a 70k novel and read X number of books, you can plan around how many words you can write and books you can read to figure out how long it should take.
3. Decide on what you want to do, but leave it open-ended. This is actually not an approach I'd recommend. Time is finite but procrastination is infinite. Picking an end date means that choices have to be made about where this thing is going, rather than just planning it forever and never actually starting. Or finishing.

The important thing is to work with the free time you have - a writer with a full time job and three kids is likely to have less free time than one with no kids and/or no full time job. Some days it's just not possible to write, because of work, family, or general life commitments. That's fine. Goals need to be realistic, and if it's not realistic for you to write every day, then don't. What's important is to make the space for writing every day, so if you can't write do something else - read, listen to a podcast, whatever. Just make it related to your goal.

There are several well-known events in the writing calendar that can fit in with your timeline. The obvious one is NaNoWriMo in November, but there's also Camp NaNoWriMo, a "virtual writer's retreat" that runs in April and July. Also running in April and November is the Poem a Day Challenge where a poetry prompt is posted every day for a month. There's also Story a Day in May, which does the same thing with short story prompts (although to be honest some of them seem more like exercises).

I've been posting these every two weeks, but it's actually Christmas Day two weeks today so I'm going to leave it three weeks until the next one of these.
clhollandwriter: (Default)
Since some of the previous links have been for those relatively far along in their writing, this one's for beginners. FutureLearn has a free online course, Start Writing Fiction, starting on 9th January.
clhollandwriter: (Default)
Today, a podcast. The Odyssey Podcast, which is made up of 10-15 minute extracts from guest speakers at the Odyssey Writing Workshop.
clhollandwriter: (Default)
There probably isn't a speculative fiction writer out there who isn't already aware of Doug Smith's Foreign Markets List - but just in case one stumbles across this - go forth and submit reprints across the world!
clhollandwriter: (Default)
Today's entry is a website I love, because it's full of weird and wonderful things that show that sometimes truth really is stranger than fiction - http://www.atlasobscura.com/.
clhollandwriter: (Default)
For today, something fun and catchy: Weird Al "Word Crimes".
clhollandwriter: (Default)
Like a lot of writers, I'm a pantser not a plotter. I'd really like to learn how to plot though (I might get more finished that way). Writer Julie Frost pointed out this series of blog posts on exactly that - The Secrets of Story Structure. I haven't read them yet, but I've heard good things.
clhollandwriter: (Default)
Today's advent entry is another useful tool, for writers who want to design their own e-book covers. Because let's face it, while being able to hire someone to make art for you is great, sometimes it's not possible or affordable. Canva lets you do all the work yourself, and comes with handy tutorials. Mostly it's free, although some of the pre-designed layouts and custom bits have a (small) price tag. Obviously pay for any pictures you bring in from stock sites or the like.
clhollandwriter: (Default)
For today, we have http://www.ambient-mixer.com, a white noise generating website for writers who like their noise with a bit more of a specific atmosphere than rain or oceans (although these are probably available). It has offerings like Gryffindor Common Room, and In Rivendell, and a number of "ambient categories" to choose from. It also allows you to create your own sound mix. Perfect for those who are tired of pretending they're in a coffee shop.
clhollandwriter: (Default)
Today's is a useful tool for putting up links to Amazon. ASIN.info allows you to enter the ASIN or Amazon link to your eBook and it will take the user to their local Amazon site. There's a bunch of stuff on the website about commission and Partner-IDs, but honestly I just use it so I don't have to put up multiple links every time, or risk clickers ending up on the wrong Amazon site.
clhollandwriter: (Default)
For today, here's an article on writing fantasy creatures from earlier this year: Gender Determination in Fantasy Creatures. This is a guest post by entomologist Robinne Weiss over at Dan Koboldt's blog. It turns out even some normal earthly creatures sort out their biological sex in weird and wonderful ways.

June 2017

S M T W T F S
    123
4567 8910
11121314151617
18192021 222324
252627282930 

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Most Popular Tags

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Jun. 28th, 2017 03:37 am
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios